Sports

NFL players emphasize reasons for anthem demonstrations


PHILADELPHIA — While the NFL continues discussions with the players’ union regarding a national anthem policy, players who demonstrate are emphasizing they are protesting social injustice, racial inequality and systematic oppression.

They are not against the country, military, flag or “The Star-Spangled Banner” itself.

President Donald Trump wants players to “find another way to protest” and contended “most of them are unable to define” what they’re demonstrating against.

Players, however, have made clear their position numerous times.

“I think part of the problem is that when you continue the rhetoric that this is controversial or this is somehow a negative thing, people treat it as such,” Philadelphia Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins said after resuming his demonstration before Thursday night’s game. “But we’ve seen in other leagues when they’ve decided to amplify the voices of their players to also emphasize the importance of the issues that we’re raising, and change the narrative away from the anthem, that not only is it more acceptable, the fan base gets educated on what we’re talking about, and we can actually make some movement.”

Jenkins stopped his demonstration last season after the NFL committed $90 million over the next seven years to social justice causes in a three-segment plan that involves league players.

Jenkins and a few teammates wore a T-shirt before the game that read on the front: “More than 60 per cent of prison populations are people of colour.” On the back, it said: “Nearly 5,000 kids are in adult prisons and jails. SchoolsNotPrisons.”

The league and the NFLPA have yet to announce a policy for this season regarding demonstrations during the anthem after the league initially ordered everyone to stand on the sideline when the anthem is played, or remain in the locker room.

League spokesman Brian McCarthy declined comment Friday and reiterated his statement Thursday night, saying “constructive” discussions are ongoing with the union.

“I understand that it’s a business and you want to protect your bottom line and all of that, but at the end of the day, I think the smartest thing right now is to not have a rule and provide a better option,” Jenkins said.

Teammate Chris Long showed his support for Jenkins, as he did last season, by putting his arm around him.

“Malcolm is taking action and he can always sleep good at night knowing that he’s not being a fraud,” Long said. “He’s (demonstrating) and he’s working in the community, like a lot of these guys are doing.”

In Miami, Dolphins receivers Kenny Stills and Albert Wilson kneeled behind teammates lined up standing along the sideline. Defensive end Robert Quinn stood and raised his right fist.

“If you continue to misinterpret what we’re doing, reach out to me, take a …read more

Source:: Sportsnet.ca

      

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