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Why Microsoft is bullish on Australia’s clamp down on media


Brad Smith

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Hello and welcome to Insider Advertising for February 23. I’m senior advertising reporter Lauren Johnson, and here’s what’s going on:

Microsoft sides with publishers
How Mattel revamped Barbie.
Roark Capital’s bet on nostalgia.

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Tips, comments, suggestions? Drop me a line at LJohnson@businessinsider.com or on Twitter at @LaurenJohnson.

Microsoft’s Brad Smith lays out why the company is taking news publishers’ side in the fight with big tech

An Australia law requiring tech companies to pay publishers led Facebook to ban news on the platform.
Microsoft’s president Brad Smith said he hoped other countries adopt similar measures.
Microsoft is also working with European publishers on an “Australian-style arbitration mechanism.”

Read the story.

Inside Barbie’s comeback: How Mattel repositioned the 60-year-old doll as a woke role model and reversed its sales slump

Tanya Dua reports that Barbie sales have soared in the pandemic, its worldwide gross billings up 19% in the fourth quarter.
The results reversed a years-long slump in sales.
They also followed the brand’s efforts to diversify its product and marketing.

Read the story.

How Neal Aronson built Roark Capital into a booming business by buying up dying nostalgia brands like Jamba Juice and Arby’s

Neal Aronson founded Roark Capital in 2001 after working in the hotel business.
Roark has acquired 90 brands that have 63,000 locations and account for $54 billion in system revenues.
Roark is best known for its fast-food empire and brands such as Jamba, Arby’s, and Dunkin’.
Read the story.

More stories we’re reading:

Clubhouse users should assume they’re being recorded, a data-privacy expert said, following a breach that sent conversations to another website (Business Insider)

New data suggests ‘The Office’ gave a boost to NBCUniversal’s Peacock, but losing the show didn’t hurt Netflix (Business Insider)

How American Eagle Outfitters outperformed its peers during the pandemic thanks to ‘distribution nodes,’ body positivity, and TikTok (Business Insider)

Democrats ask cable and streaming providers about their role in spreading misinformation ahead of Capitol riot (CNBC)

Google to lift political ad ban put in place following Capitol siege (Axios)

Thanks for reading and see you tomorrow! You can reach me in the meantime at LJohnson@businessinsider.com and subscribe to this daily email here.

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Source:: Business Insider

      

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