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One Day is perfectly bingeable – but there’s a glaring problem with the plot


This image released by Netflix shows Ambika Mod, right, and Leo Woodall in a scene from the mini-series
Yet it’s clear from the start that Emma has feelings (Picture: Ludovic Robert/Netflix)

Boy meets girl. Girl has a crush on boy. But boy isn’t so sure he’s ready.

After a huge back and forth, boy realises he’s been in love with girl all along.

It’s a tale as old as time and it’s the plot to

Yet it’s clear from the start that Emma has feelings (Picture: Ludovic Robert/Netflix)

Boy meets girl. Girl has a crush on boy. But boy isn’t so sure he’s ready.

After a huge back and forth, boy realises he’s been in love with girl all along.

It’s a tale as old as time and it’s the plot to Netflix’s TV adaptation of One Day, based on David Nicholls’ novel of the same name and the 2011 film starring Anne Hathaway.

It’s hailed by many as a beautiful love story, but it still relies on the infuriating romantic trope that the evasive man will eventually realise true love was right under his nose all along.

It’s a plot point I’ll never be able to quite get past.

I remember wasting many years of my single life hoping that a man who blew hot and cold would suddenly realise how great I was.

In my teens, I shed many tears over a guy who acted as though the sheer tightness of his skinny jeans was enough reason to find a new girl to help him out of them every night.

The issue with romanticising the emotionally unavailable man on screen is that we can often make excuses for the emotionally unavailable man off screen.

I believed this man’s insistence on shagging others and failure to make a commitment to me may simply be part of our tangled romantic journey.

Spoiler alert. It wasn’t.

But I had grown up being taught that the course of true love never runs smoothly. It wasn’t a simple tale of boy meets girl without a series of hurdles to get to the happy ever after.

It wasn’t a simple tale of boy meets girl without a series of hurdles to get to the happy ever after (Picture: Netflix)

The issue with romanticising the emotionally unavailable man on screen is that we can often make excuses for the emotionally unavailable man off screen (Picture: AP)

I believed that, like the men I saw depicted on screen, a love interest could be scared of their feelings, not sure they were ready for commitment or dealing with issues from their past.

It took me years to realise that this man only ever exists in fiction. In reality, if a man acts like he’s not interested, it’s because he usually isn’t.

For anyone who hasn’t seen One Day, Emma (Ambika Mod) and Dexter (Leo Woodall) meet at Edinburgh University on the day of their graduation in 1988. They’re from different worlds – he’s a rich boy from the south and she’s a working class girl from the north.

After a one night stand that never quite was, they agree to be friends. Yet it’s clear from the start that Emma has feelings, while Dexter claims to adore her, but continues to shag his way through a series of forgetful lovers.

Over 20 years, they stay in touch while snapshots of their lives are revealed on the same day – …read more

Source:: Metro

      

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