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‘Our Father’: What Is the Quiverfull Movement and Did Donald Cline Join It?


Keith Boyle as Dr. Donald Cline in a swimming pool with people surrounding him in Netflix's 'Our Father'
Keith Boyle as Donald Cline in Netflix’s ‘Our Father’ | Netflix

What is the Quiverfull movement?

The Quiverfull movement is a Christian-based philosophy held by some couples who consider large families blessings from God. Therefore, it preaches procreation and abstention from sterilization

Netflix’s new documentary Our Father tells the harrowing story of an Indianapolis-based fertility doctor Donald Cline who allegedly impregnated over 90 women with his semen without their knowledge. Some of those interviewed believe Cline is a member of the Quiverfull movement, but did he ever actually join it?

Keith Boyle as Donald Cline in Netflix’s ‘Our Father’ | Netflix

What is the Quiverfull movement?

The Quiverfull movement is a Christian-based philosophy held by some couples who consider large families blessings from God. Therefore, it preaches procreation and abstention from sterilization and birth control.

The belief’s name originates from Psalm 127, “Children are a heritage of the Lord, and fruit of the womb is his reward; happy is the man who has his quiver full of them.” The Quiverfull metaphor describes the children as weapons, or arrows, to be used to spread their values, which believers view as “saving the world.”

The Duggars used to represent wholesome family TV. Now, almost 20 years and a jail sentence later, it’s time we take a closer look at the Christian Patriarchy and Quiverfull movements that spawned the Duggars. pic.twitter.com/yqeyO5bMQU

— Full Frontal with Samantha Bee (@FullFrontalSamB) March 11, 2022

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Throughout the early 20th century, when birth control methods began to advance and spread, many conservative Christian movements rejected them, considering their use as going against God.

Around the same time, Quiverfull became popular in the United States. After Nancy Cambell’s 1977 magazine Above Rubies which encouraged women to stay home and raise large families, Mary Pride’s The Way Home: Beyond Feminism, Back to Reality is credited with igniting the Quiverfull movement.

Quiverfull followers do not believe in birth control or fertility treatments

The author detailed her experience moving away from her “feminist” beliefs and toward discovering happiness within the role of a mom and wife, as portrayed in the Bible.

Pride used several Bible verses to defend her argument, and they became the foundation of the conservative movement. Social networks and the Internet have since spread the belief to several areas outside the United States.

Former Indiana doctor Donald Cline front and center in Times Square. Documentary film “Our Father” debuts on @netflix Wednesday morning. @JacobaBallard came to me 7 years ago and I helped her get the truth. The film is insane. pic.twitter.com/wsroSr1osG

— Angela Ganote (@angelaganote) May 9, 2022

Many followers believe they obey God’s word by having many children, citing Bible verses including Genesis 1:22 and Isaiah 66:9. Additionally, some consider it their obligation to raise as many kids as they can in the belief to further Christianity.

Believers also believe the inability to have children, what they refer to as an “empty quiver,” is God’s choice. Therefore, they view infertility treatments as interfering with God’s plan. Even though not at all Quiverfull followers adhere to everything the original movement states, all believe birth control is …read more

Source:: Showbiz Cheat Sheet

      

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