Culture

As statewide protections end, California renters demand more rights


ANTIOCH, CALIFORNIA - JUNE 22: Kamilah Miller, left, and others take part in a march after a rally at the Delta Pines apartment complex in Antioch, Calif., on Wednesday, June 22, 2022. The rally highlighted the needs for rent stabilization, tenant anti-harassment and just-cause for eviction ordinances in the city. (Jane Tyska/Bay Area News Group)

ANTIOCH — With the state’s last remaining COVID-eviction protections set to expire next week, dozens of renters rallied Wednesday demanding protection against steep rent hikes, landlord harassment and poor living conditions.

Waving signs that read “Housing is a human right” and “The rent is too damn high,” residents complained of roach and mold-infested apartments, sewage flooding their bathrooms and out-of-the-blue rent hikes of hundreds of dollars.

Many of the complaints centered on Delta Pines — a low-income apartment complex in Antioch with nearly 200 units. But the issues extend throughout Antioch and the entire Bay Area, tenants’ rights organizers say. A survey of 1,000 Antioch renters released this month found that respondents spend, on average, 63% of their income on rent — making it difficult to pay for food, medicine, childcare and other expenses.

And the situation could get worse come June 30 when the state’s COVID-eviction protections end. Those measures already have expired on a local level in many Bay Area cities, leaving renters grappling with the threat of looming evictions as they struggle with inflation, sky-high gas prices, gentrification and high interest rates that put the prospect of homeownership out of reach for many.

ANTIOCH, CALIFORNIA – JUNE 22: Kamilah Miller, left, and others take part in a march after a rally at the Delta Pines apartment complex in Antioch, Calif., on Wednesday, June 22, 2022. The rally highlighted the needs for rent stabilization, tenant anti-harassment and just-cause for eviction ordinances in the city. (Jane Tyska/Bay Area News Group) 

Many of the families who moved to this East Bay city were priced out of San Francisco and the South Bay.

“It used to be really affordable out here. People weren’t paying as much for rent as they are now,” said Devin Williams, a community organizer with the Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment. “I’m worried. People are going to have to live in two-bedroom apartments with two different families and work two jobs. It’s really scary.”

Hoping to stem a new tide of homelessness as COVID decimated the economy, state officials put in place a series of measures limiting landlords’ power to evict tenants and providing funds to pay rent for struggling tenants. Landlords are prohibited from evicting renters who have applied for that relief and have a pending application — but that protection ends at the end of the month. And those funds have been slow to materialize. Earlier this month, at least 16,000 Bay Area applications still were pending.

“After the 30th, we don’t know what’s going to happen,” Williams said. “There might be a tsunami of evictions.”

In the meantime, some Bay Area cities are implementing or considering new rules to protect tenants at the local level. Concord City Council last week passed an ordinance making it illegal for landlords to harass tenants. The Antioch City Council in January directed its city staff to draft proposed ordinances that would impose rent control, prohibit landlord harassment and bar evictions that don’t meet certain …read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Entertainment

      

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